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will be released into the environment and wind up in the food chain. >> conducting chemical analysis will not help me if there is poisonous stuff flying around in the air. or finding its way into the groundwater. >> there is a tradition of mining in the area. 2000 years ago, the romans mind for goals here. it is thought to have one of the biggest gold deposits in western europe. mining here is lucrative, even if the excavation is costly environmental regulations strict. the people are divided on the issue. some residents are banding together to raise support for the mine. the mother of this young family is one of them. like 40% of the population, she is out of work. >> i hope that thanks to the mine, we will be able to stay and our family will have a future here. otherwise, we will have to move away. >> but where to? the effects of the economic crisis are being felt across spain. in this region, there is little industry outside of traditional coal mining, and its days are numbered. the regional government could sorely use the tax revenue the gold mine would generate. the socialist-led government d
's efforts to protect its spectacular natural environment. air pollution regulations require special summer and winter gasoline blends in the state. refineries are making that seasonal switch now. but that reduces supply which was already tight after a fire in august shut down part of a chevron refinery at richmond near san francisco. then last week a power failure temporarily knocked out an exxon refinery at torrance in southern california. >> the richmond refinery and torrance refinery account for about 25% of the production in california because they are two of the biggest refiners we have. it is easy to see why the wholesalers panic. >> as wholesalers raise prices, drivers started to panic as gas seemed to get more expensive by the hour. >> i just don't see it going down any time soon. >> reporter: state energy officials are trying to reassure drivers that price spikes like this don't last. >> this is a very dramatic one. but we do know that what goes up does come down and often quite quickly. >> reporter: in fact, wholesale prices have started coming down. dropping 55 cents on the spot
question. germany's environment minister believe so, but he says the country has to completely rethink the way it subsidizes renewals. >> with elections due next year, the rising cost of electricity has become an issue. environment minister is calling for a government overhaul of renewable energy. he says current policy favors quantity, not quality. >> we need the appropriate instruments to ensure that the expansion of renewable energy takes place in a steady and predictable fashion, and we want to make renewals competitive on the energy market as soon as possible -- we want to make renewables competitive on the energy market as soon as possible. >> he is also calling on a time line on phasing out government subsidies, and he wants to regulate the pace of the grid, but in germany's greens say the cost of switching to renewable resources are being unfairly distributed. >> stay with us. when we come back, the international community marking the very first girls' state. we will see how schoolgirls in pakistan are showing their support for the 14-year-old activist shot by the taliban. -- m
government to assess impact of the ospreys on the local environment. officials think the aircraft could harm quality of life and natural environment. >>> it looks like a large flying insect. but is actually a man made device to make disaster response more effective. and it is being used by a japanese company to reach damaged sites that are hard to reach. and to send back high revolution, resolution video images. >> it takes pictures. it can shoot a video like this. through the work of of aerial company in this prefecture. they photograph disaster areas across japan. >> translator: the unique thing is it can go places where humans cannot, take photos and gather valuable information. >> reporter: four years ago the team made this unmanned aircraft guided by remote control, it flies to locations, takes pictures and returns. at the end of march last year, the aircraft made headlines. it flew over the damaged nuclear plant in fukushima right after the disaster. from a hite of 400 meters, it took high resolution photos. this shows the first details of the damage. it provided crucial information on
reimburse the states that have spent money to clean up the environment. only one state in the gulf coast has spent enough money to demand reimbursement from cleaning up the environment, which is louisiana. the other states, texas, alabama, mississippi, they also want money from the feds. my guess is that the feds will distribute that money to the states and will collect a lot of money from b.p., somewhere closer to the $20 billion and this case will be over. >>shepard: over and done with, that is it and b.p. can go on and make more billions. >>judge napolitano: what you said at the outset is significant because the people who received money from b.p. agreed never to sue it again for anything having to do with this. they didn't know that there might be another spill or another sheen coming from the original spill. they will not be able to sue for damages from that. >>shepard: stand by for news. judge napolitano, thank you. >> we are in politics land in kentucky and we will show you the latest polls on the race for the president mechanic -- neck and neck across the nation. and erin will join u
that they foster or can deal in a diverse environment. that's understood the plan, that it's not just giving you a plus because of race. it is combining that with other factors. >> there is a plus because of race. many factors in the decision. might i say that the white student president of the class in a different school is a measure of leadership. leadership is an independent factor in the pai. he's not getting a point because of his race. he's getting that because of his leadership. but his recent tour criteria to argue for anyone. it is an independent add-on, something they can use to boost a pai score or element in any way they like as they contextualize it. is that it's not necessarily, not narrowly tailored. it ignores alternatives and gives disparate treatment to asian-americans because they are minorities as well enter the extent it depends on the classroom factor, there's simply no way to relate or fit what they are doing to the solution of the problem, which they use as a major foundation of their proposal, which is the nonfirst first classroom. certainly dishes no correspondence ther
at the international trading environment and worry about that. this is the answer to your question. a world and which the united states is strong but all of the institutions is eroding is not a world of 2011. the united states has an interest in trying its best to shore up institutions. >> this is great. >> get set to run it, john. >> a couple of quick points. my thesis is not the institutions are independent. they are instruments of power. they are used to signal limits on power. power is never divorce from institution. a venture that regard, i idea that the united states has been so brilliant for half a century or longer because, it has allowed it to make the power more durable and expensive but also making it more delimited and less based on arbitrary use of power and the most traditional sense. there are a vehemence of republican allow for the state to be more influential by allowing it to signal its own strength. a couple of more point about this. my underlying argument is that we are shifting from one organized around trilateral world, the u.s. rip germany, japan, the kind of trilateral system.
clients, the environment you want to stay is diversified as possible. i think this last quarter was a great example of that. europe, everybody looks at the negative in europe, yet it was a good place to be. spread your bets out right now. >> so do you expect that we are at this point going to see pretty good guidance, tough guidance? what about that guidance that you're looking for in. >> yeah, i think that's going to be the big question here. i think today's a great example of that. you have alcoa, the traditional capital goods manufacturing cyclical versus a yum brands, which is going to tell you maybe how the global consumer is doing. even the guidance we're going to get today may very well set the tone for what kind of messaging we get this earnings season. >> i want to tell you that alcoa is out three cents a share, actual earnings. expecting a flat showing. so it looks like it's better than expected. we are looking at a pop in the stock as these numbers are released. of course, we want to get more details on the quarter. revenue coming in at $5.8 billion versus an estimate
important way to create an environment of changes around creating community support for education. leadershipen's program where we have worked with 400 people to inform them about the importance of women having access to numerous seats, literacy, and forming part of the community in terms of investing in jobs and learning. >> keep up the good work in afghanistan. you're watching bbc world news america. the chinese also picked up the nobel prize, we will tell you what is between the pages that one such high praise. the human rights group amnesty international says millions of people in china are affected by forced evictions from their land. the debt ridden local authorities are increasingly seizing and selling off land. martin has more on this story from beijing. >> we are in a neighborhood of beijing slated for demolition. this used to be somebody's,, horrible strewn across the place. if you look to my right, you can see just beyond another empty home. what is surprising is that many people have chosen to stay. i have seen an old man in the garden tending his vegetables and anothe
environment. i don't think it's a sure thing we're going to have a continued recovery, but i think the chances are that we will keep going. connell: martin, thank you again for always coming on us with. dr. martin bailey with us from d.c. thank you, sir. >> thank you. dagen: california gasoline prices hitting another new record high for the state today. $4.66 a gallon. that is up 86 cents from one year ago. and california's governor jerry brown taking emergency action as the state's prices have become -- well, they are the highest in the nation. connell: they certainly are. we go right now with fox news correspondent adam housely in l.a. with the latest. >> dagen and connell, you mentioned 4.66 a gallon or so, you would be hard-pressed to find that price in much of los angeles. in fact right here behind me you can see this gas station 4.99 for regular, 5.19 for premium. just down the street, the gas there is 5.39 for regular unleaded. across los angeles, in fact, i drove down the state yesterday from northern california to southern california, no matter where you drive, you're finding gas pric
requested-- demanded-- that this building, everyone on staff, this this be a meat-free environment for the day that you are here. >> yes. >> stephen: so if i'm woozy right now it's because i haven't had my bacon. (laughter) why? why are you so militant about not only, like, not -- not you having meat but not even seeing meat? >> because animals are nicer than humans and they're conscious beings. (cheers and applause) >> stephen: really. >> yes. >> stephen: what about animals that eat other animals? can i eat a lion? >> only when they have to. >> stephen: what about one that's already dead. like a cow that's been sentenced to death for a murder? (laughter) or a pig that commits suicide from listening to too many of your songs? (laughter) >> you shouldn't laugh at that. >> stephen: i know a lamb that's a (bleep)ing ass (bleep). can i eat that lamb? can i eat that lamb? (laughter) >> if you spit your grandmother in an oven she will probably be tasty. but is that any reason to eat your grandmother. >> stephen: that reminds me, you have an album and a song "meat is murder." have you eve
-free environment for the day that you are here. >> yes. >> stephen: so if i'm woozy right now it's because i haven't had my bacon. (laughter) why? why are you so militant about not only, like, not -- not you having meat but not even seeing meat? >> because animals are nicer than humans and they're conscious beings. (cheers and applause) >> stephen: really. >> yes. >> stephen: what about animals that eat other animals? can i eat a lion? >> only when they have to. >> stephen: what about one that's already dead. like a cow that's been sentenced to death for a murder? (laughter) or a pig that commits suicide from listening to too many of your songs? (laughter) >> you shouldn't laugh at that. >> stephen: i know a lamb that's a (bleep)ing ass (bleep). can i eat that lamb? can i eat that lamb? (laughter) >> if you spit your grandmother in an oven she will probably be tasty. but is that any reason to eat your grandmother. >> stephen: that reminds me, you have an album and a song "meat is murder." have you ever thought about the unintended consequences of saying that? because when i hear that i just think
. the environment has gotten such a got you environment that even the politicians themselves and regulators have to do their business with one eye over the shoulders for fear of being dragged into some congressional committee or they'll be exposed for having to talk to leaders. so i think this idea of working together, i think in order to allow people to work together, there has to be a little bit of a letup. another thing is you can't kill people if everything doesn't work out perfectly. who the heck is going to take the jobs in business and government. you'll always get people that want to be ceo and senator and cabinet secretaries, but it might not be the people you want if you make it so punishing for them to take the job and unsustainable to be in the job because who gets it right all the time? >> that's actually an important distinction. john chambers and i were talking about it. in business, you take risks. some of them work out. some of them don't. in government, it's very difficult to take risks because if something goes badly, you're going to get pilloried for it. there's no particular
environment -- there's no question it's tough. >> i mean, you are taking advantage of this, not a revival, but this emergence of the asian consumer. you're finding markets there that are meeting your needs very quickly, aren't you? >> sure. we have a business in asia. we've got a business in russia that exports to china. we have a business in india, brazil. we've got positions in our core businesses paper and packaging in the emerging markets. our biggest market is still here in north america. >> speak of north america, how concerned are you about fiscal cliff and what it might do to consumer demand here or business demand for your products? >> well, i think i'm a realistic optimist. i don't think we'll hit the fiscal cliff. i don't think that was intended by the members of congress. we're kind of going to probably deal with this at the 11th hour and the 59th minute. i think we'll manage through it because everybody, i think, in congress knows that wouldn't be a good thing for the economy. that's what's most important right now. >> jamie dimon of jpmorgan today revealed that they've set u
the industrial back to work. how much is obama spending every year on an green global environment? how much money has he spent on the environment? everybody keeps calling me wanting me to go to college and stuff. how can i go to work -- there is no industrial work? >> thank you for the call. you mentioned ron paul -- of course it was congressman paul ryan debating tonight. >> i want to state that you said earlier that somebody on the page stated joe biden was a fool. he was an overly aggressive. i feel like obama should have been more aggressive with romney in the first debate. look, joe biden put it this administrative record on the record. paul ryan that could not back up what he was saying. >> ok. thank you for the call. john has this point. . >> and other men are two with your calls and comments and another chance to see the debate in its entirety. less is on the phone from kentucky. >> is essentially the format really did not serve either by then -- joe biden or paul ryan. i thought the constant interruptions word beneath the dignity of somebody running for the office. joe biden really turns
about monetary policy and current environment and focus primarily the role of large-scale asset purchases. before doing so let me note the usual disclaim, the thoughts are about to give you are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of others on the fomc. there is a considerable diversity of views within the fomc and within, among economists more generally about the use of large-scale asset purchases, lsaps and other unconventional policy tools. this healthy given unenviable circumstances we find ourselves. let me be clear where i stand. i support the committees decision of last month, namely to initiate purchases of mortgage-backed securities, mbs, at a rate of $40 billion a month in tandem with the ongoing maturity extension program of treasury securities. and to plant a con to continue those purchases if the committee does not observe a substantial improvement in the labor market outlook. given where we are and given what we know i firmly believe this was the right decision. in my comments today, i'm only going to briefly review the kise for taking that action as tha
the environment? caller: i would definitely like to see the moderator not let them ramble on. host: so you want time constraints? caller: yes, definitely. i was so disappointed that people are not looking beyond words, because anyone can say anything. host: this was a style section of the washington post this morning about the role of the moderator -- that was about the moderator. the washington times this morning as a piece thishow president obama attended mark their ballotss -- attended martha raddatz's mary stuart ex- husband and some are concerned that she will be biased tonight. now a call from a democratic viewer. caller: my take on this is i hope that joe biden acts exactly like president obama. president obama and acted like he was the president. he could not be rattled by mr. mitt romney. and i hope that vice-president biden does the same, and i think he will. ryan just is not old enough. he does not have enough experience to be vice president or president. neither one of them should be president. host: this is the washington post with this headline -- caller: i don't think that he was
are not just the risks we take. the environmental is such a "got you" environment even the regulators have to do their business with one eye over the shoulders for fear of being dragged over the national committee and having to be skboesed to talk to leaders. i think in order to allow people to work together, there has to be a little bit of a let-up. another thing is you can't kill people if everything doesn't work out properly. who the heck is going to take the job whether in business or otherwise. it might not be the people you want if you make it so punishing for them to take the job and so unsustain tobl be in the job because who gets it right all the time? >> that's actually an important distinction. john chal bers and i wither talking about it. in business, you asigh you take risks. some of them work out. some of them don't. in government, it's very difficult to take risks because if something goes badly, you're goingo get pilleried for it. the balance that you worry about is very different, right? >> it is. business has an advantage that we know if we don't take risks, there's low c
political environment for the president this season. what's happening now if you look across the country, democrats uh knew it would be a close race. as we get to the end here, even though the president does have an advantage in swing states, democrats are getting that it's time to close the deal. money has been picking up for democrats. >> what about enthusiasm? the democrats have a gap in terms of the enthusiasm of young people according to the polling. >> i think money has had an impact, especially in ohio. the romney campaign hadn't been advertising in youngstown for the first couple of weeks of last month. that hurt hem in the polls. the romney campaign has to step up to make sure they have the resources. the enthusiasm gap really helps them. this will be a tight election. both sides will be excited. >> bill, you worked in the white house. you have done debate prep before. what happened? who didn't show up? where was barack obama last wednesday? >> i don't think anybody, including the media was ready for mitt romney. somebody willing to walk away from their bigs policy positions, ta
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of the people are protesting against brought up an authoritarian environment. where nothing was produced unless it was sanctioned by the government, nothing, no film, no book, nothing. in so they look at the world the revolutionary saw that. they concluded that the u.s. was abandoning because we would not allow the stepup protests unless it was a clear signal of we were abandoning. in other words, they toughen their own experience, this doesn't happen the less it is orchestrated by the government. and so that actually entered as the opposition thinking the u.s. is abandoning. barbara administrations, basically protesting. is just a different conceptual paranormal the world. it. >> one more question. >> can you explain that position is this to do with russia and america? what are they trying to point out? >> a good question. many different levels. russia as an arms relationship. lots of business and iran s.w.a.t. the very small thing. was not kept a very well until recently. but it is their only port in the mediterranean another naval vessel, so these are some of the practical aspects. the large
bain is doing is that totally egregious given the environment, but we don't know they're doing it before. i think it cuts against this image of bain as this analyzing the really getting in bed with the russian government. i also thought if you look at the things -- go ahead. >> no, just wrap up as quickly as you can. >> if you look at what the bain employees say, they do not have a whole lot of remorse about getting involved with tobacco but some do feel bad about getting involved with the privatization swindle. they think, this may have been something we should not have done. >> zach carter, thank you for being with this, senior political economy reporter at the huffington post. his latest article, co-written by jason cherkis, "mitt romney's bain made millions on big tobacco in u.s., russia." when we come back, we will find out why thousands of workers at foxconn in china walked out as the or making -- as they were making the iphone5. stay with us. ♪ [music break] >> this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman in santa fe, new mexico
-worth and purpose. i think most americans believe the same thing off. some were created an environment in this country where it was more highly rewarded and priced. not just for the fellas, but the women as well. when we come back, more and more americans are getting behind mitt romney, and a new poll shows the president's. next why people are lacking in now. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn symptoms caused by acid reflux disease. osteoporosis-related ne fractures and low magnesium levels have been seen with nexium. possible side effects include headache, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. other serious stomach conditions may still exist. talk to your doctor about nexium. the skin they were born with and say they'd die for darker skin. sadly, some actually do. change your thinking, not your skin. stop tanning. learn more at spotskincancer.org. ♪ gerri: well, the lead in the polls evaporate if the first presidential debate where mitt romney emerged as the clear winner. what does obama's less than stellar performance me for the vice-presidential debate thursday? joining me now, boar
off. some were created an environment in this country where it was more highly rewarded and priced. not just for the fellas, but the women as well. when we come back, more and more americans are getting behind mitt romney, and a new poll shows the president's. next why people are lacking in now. you see us, at the start of the day. on the company phone lt that's a few names longer. you see us bank on busier highways. on once empty fields. everyday you see all the ways all of us at us bank are helping grow our economy. lending more so companies and communities can expand, grow stronger and get back to work. everyday you see all of us serving you, around the country, around the corner. us bank. ♪ gerri: well, the lead in the polls evaporate if the first presidential debate where mitt romney emerged as the clear winner. what does obama's less than stellar performance me for the vice-presidential debate thursday? joining me now, board member of the wall street journal. always great to have you with me. on set. i feel so special. let's look at some of the polls. from the closing the g
provide the permitting under broad standards set by the federal government. that protects the environment and we produce more energy, domestic energy an jobs from this country. melissa: can you tell me physically what takes the process so much longer? is it your filling out pieces of paper you send them in and don't hear back forever? what in the permitting process takes gap 10 days, couple days in one situation and 290 days in the other? what is it? >> melissa, frankly it is federal bureaucracy. it is red tape. it is epa. bureau land management. what they're doing, they have got a very lengthy, extensive and uncertain permitting process that ties up industry for no real benefit that means less domestic oil, less domestic energy and fewer jobs. melissa: so what's the answer? is it no permits at all? is there a way to expedite the process? do you do the permits locally? what's the answer? >> well, that's, i appreciate you asking that question. that's my point. here in the state of north dakota we're a good example. on private lands we get the wells permitted in 10 days. with the legislatio
the economy in an environment, it's difficult to reduce expenses because a lot of expenses of liquids and economic situation that one related to unemployment benefits. in terms of the financial sector, we have to address a problem of pressure, sending, a problem of capacity and a problem of governance and transparency. most of this issue aren't linked with the savings banks. by definition, they were operating with a degree of concentration with real estate, but there's a lot of albums for these things. in terms of funding, there was working with a stronger to touchÉ and with the capacity in the course of 10 minutes a weaker segment of the sector was much more effective to as a problem throughout the system overcapacity. this is at the overcapacity in the spanish financial site are we'll be in the region of 30%. in this problem is going to be address because as a result of the injection of private sector money, the process is going to take in terms of their restructuring of the sector and is going to alter banks that have been the objects of private sector money injection to restructu
and create jobs and helping environments. we do a tremendous amount for education and veterans. we have hired, and if you're a veteran in this room thank you very much for serving this country, we have hired 4800 veterans this year in the last 18 months or so. there is this thing called 100,000 jobs which we help starting hired 28,000 veterans and we have done 4500 ourselves. while other people are talking, we are doing. before this program we will do 1000 so we try to participate and to me it's all the same thing, healthy vibrant company, makes it all possible. the dying company, now been it is possible. i will put it in that same thing by the way, people say as an employee or shareholder if i don't make customers happy there is nothing else. if our employees don't do a good job -- it's all important to me. i try to run a fair profit, take care of your own people in your clients. let me go back to the mistake issue one more time. here's a question for you all. we have something like $15 billion in exposure in derivatives and hedging and bouncing around. you could easily tell me get it down.
? so you come into this environment. many people came in without a job. they're just volunteers and they want to get a job. some people, so they want to get noticed by the right people. and they, you know, and you have people who have been hired who want maybe more responsibility, right, and they probably traditional in their job. you have department heads who are racing against each other to maybe get a little more budget than the other and get a little more turf than the others than you might expect. you have this thing going on where it is a very chaotic time and you really need to get control of this because in this environment where there are no sort of norms, it is like building a village from scratch where everybody comes to a place with no rules, no norms, no structures, right? it's like the wild west and not everybody, you know, some people who, you know, have their own tactics for getting their own way, right? sometimes even good people lose control of their inner jerks. that is a problem early in the campaign, right? we all have them, come on. so you throw an elbow at
-rich environment and i think he should take the targets. >> what kind of vibe do you expect? >> aggressive biden. >> shameless plugs? >> i'm going to plug eli lake, all over this libya story. >> yes, he has. >> another one today on information that e-mails come paining about the security of the embassy there. he's a must read every day. >> security situation and all fingers point to the state department. >> i'm going to be original and plug dean progress at 150,000 -- 160,000 followers and hoping for to 0,000. >> twitter? >> yes. i'm on twitter. on twitter. >> help you with the plug. >> issues week of "the washington post" every day we're doing a big take-out two pages on the differences between the candidates on the issues. >> today is? >> economy. >> thank you very much. that's it for this edition of "the daily rundown. "tomorrow, four weeks until election day and another way to show off bells and whistles but we have something new. the new decision act. bye-bye. >>> this is your business travel forecast. chilly air will continue to sit there and with sunshine in the afternoon. still only in t
bachmann 20 times over. so it's not exactly an environment conducive for great heroic foreign policy. mam tell your dughters not to grow up to secretaries of state, not now. you want to be secretary of education, not secretary of state. >> rose: (laughs) so what ought to be the foreign policy debate in this campaign? >> well, i tell you what i've been focused on and i think it's about making our own country strong, charlie. making our own country an object of emulation. because that's the greatest thing about america. we have the power of emulation, people will follow and copy us in a way that china and russia can't. china has to bully or buy people and so does russia. d think getting our own fiscal house in order, continuing to make our universities and school it is envy of the world which they once were and still should be and can be, making our industry and new products, that's the strongest thing we have right now because we live in such an interdependent world now charlie. it's so different. we live in a world where first of all our friend -- our friends collapsing hurts us so much m
environment. >> the capstone concept forward says the world is trending towards greater stability, yet it says the world is potentially more dangerous than ever. how will the stability overcome the threat? >> well, you know, when people ask me about afghanistan, the first thing i normally tell them is it's possible for violence and progress to coexist in places like afghanistan. i'd say the same thing about the paradox of stability and threat. they coexist. so i've talked about a security paradox which is violence is at an evolutionary low. and it is, except that the capabilities to impart violence are in the hands of people who heretofore wouldn't have had access to them. so you have a paradox of feeling as though the world is -- this is kind of the tom friedman the world is flat and connected and, therefore, is less likely to fight each other. maybe. but there's also the other school of thought that says it's in the unconnected parts of our globe where violence will be both more prevalent, but also more violent because the instruments of violence are more available now than they've ever been
or midpart of the novel to generationly maybe a more of a focus on the urban environment in the latest stages of the novel. but in so doing he demonstrates a little bit less familiarity with that slice of contemporary chinese life and i think these younger writers are probably more in their -- you might say native habitat when they're writing about these. >> brown: xiao qiang, a brief word on that? how this fits into contemporary writing? >> i think it's very interesting to see how the chinese state media lauded about his receiving this award. in contrast with the former two chinese, as you mentioned, that one is gao xingjian, in exile, the government doesn't approve his politics and the other is liu jiabao. mo yan is his pen name. and his pen name means "don't speak q. sots there's a popular internet joke saying "who is the first chinese winner of a nobel prize? don't speak. who's the second chinese nobel piece prize winner? don't speak. who's the third one? don't speak. this one is mo yan. but two other people are being banned and the chinese official media and chinese internet. >> pelley:
in the environment of war, thought it was too dangerous. that's something that the president and the vice-president, certainly, the secretary of state, should be aware of, all the time. >> greta: all right. nobel peace prize to the e.u., the european union. >> well, it could have been worse, they could have given it to barack obama again. this is the example of the trivialization and the polittization of the whole nobel peace prize process and a fundamental misconception about why europe is at peace. it is not the european union, it is because of american power and the nato alliance because we sheltered europe in the cold war to give them the chance to work out some of their differences. >> greta: the eu. is failing, the economy is going under and they are creating another global crisis. the imf said, countries about to go bankrupt in the e.u., the idea that they are being rewarded a a morale boost treminded me of a pee wee league and a sports team and you give them all trophies because they are 6 years old and you want everyone to gets a trophy. this is not a success story. >> no, it is
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